1 Brarg

Ib Extended Essay Topic Categories

While the extended essay is an excellent opportunity to explore a topic of choice in depth, it is important that we adhere to the basic requirements of the IB. It is easy to become carried away with an idea that seems fantastic, but in the end is neither relevant nor focused. This page offers an overview of both the general and subject specific requirements. 

General requirements

  • The extended essay is required to receive the full IB Diploma. Failure to submit an extended essay will result in a failure of the Diploma.
  • The extended essay may be no longer than 4, words. Although there is no minimum word count, it is recommended to write at least 3, words.
  • The essay is assessed externally by an IB examiner. 
  • The topic of the extended essay is focused around a research question.
  • The topic of the extended essay is chosen by students. It must relate to one of the DP courses. Schools often decide that the topic must relate to a course that the student takes and the school offers.
  • Each student is assigned a supervisor who spends 4 - 8 hours monitoring, consulting and supervising the project. The supervisor is usually a teacher of the subject that the essay is based on.
  • Students must meet internal deadlines set by the school, both for the final result and for tasks that the supervisor and school set.
  • Once the essay is submitted, students may be required by schools to conduct an interview with the supervisor called a 'viva voce' (see IB Extended Essay guide).
  • The essay is assessed according to the assessment criteria. These are criteria that are both general to all subjects and specific to each subject. See criteria page.
  • The final marks from both the extended essay and the Theory of Knowledge assessment are combined in a matrix to form a maximum of three points for the IB Diploma. (A total of 45 points are possible for the IB Diploma; 7 points for each of the 6 subjects, plus 3 for extended essay and Theory of Knowledge. You must have at least 24 points to earn an IB Diploma, excluding the points () earned for TOK and extended essay.) The matrix, which has been taken from the Extended Essay guide, can be found by clicking here.

Language and Literature requirements

As the Language A: Language and Literature course falls in Group 1, which is intended for native and near-native speakers, essays should demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency in the language. If students want to write in their second language, a Group 2 essay would be more appropriate.

For all Group 1 courses, there are three categories of essays that students may choose from. The following are outlined in the Extended Essay guide. 

  1. Category 1 - Studies of a literary work(s) originally written in the language in which the essay is presented.
    • literary criticism
    • well-structured and persuasive arguments
    • in-depth understanding of the texts
       
  2. Category 2 - Studies of a literary work(s) originally written in the language of the essay compared with literary work(s) originally written in another language.
    • equal comparative analysis of both texts
    • cross-cultural understanding
    • well-structured and persuasive arguments
       
  3. Category 3 - Studies in language.
    • textual analysis skills
    • reference to culture and context
    • rooted in primary and secondary sources

Remember: The definition of 'literary work' for the extended essay may include works studied in class. Having said this, students are expected to take a new or deeper approach in their studies of these texts than that taken in class. Students are also free to choose literary works from anywhere. They do not have to be taken from the Prescribed List of Authors or the Prescribed Literature in Translation. Having said this, works chosen must merit a certain level of literary quality. The professional judgment of the supervisor may be consulted for this.

The extended essay (EE) is a mandatory core component of the IB Diploma Programme. It is a research paper of up to words, giving students an opportunity to conduct independent research or investigation on a topic that interests them. Like the theory of knowledge (TOK) essay, TOK presentation, and participation in creativity, action, service activities, submitting an extended essay is a prerequisite for the award of the Diploma.

Recommended subjects[edit]

It is mandatory that the extended essay be taken from the field of one of the IB subjects being studied (e.g. the essay may be about a book that has not been studied as part of IB English).[1] However, the topic must not be too broad or too narrow as to make it difficult to write 4, words, and the general subject must be taught under the IB diploma program by one of the members of staff at the high school (so that there is someone with expertise able to help). The subject (not topic) on which the extended essay is written is recommended to be one that the candidate has formally studied, but this is not required. Also, the EE may not be written across different subjects – it must concentrate on one subject only, unless the student is writing under the World Studies topic. However, some subjects include several disciplines, with an emphasis towards one. An example is the subject Societies, which can include chemistry, biology, psychology, etc. generally with an emphasis toward one discipline.

Supervision[edit]

The supervisor provides the student with assistance in putting together their EE, including guiding them in finding a suitable research question and on how to acquire the necessary resources to complete the research (such as a specific resource material–often hard-to-find documents or books–or laboratory equipment). The supervisor may suggest improvements to a version of the EE, but must not be engaged in writing it. The IBO recommends that the supervisor spend approximately two to three hours in total with the candidate discussing the EE.

Assessment[edit]

Extended essays are marked by individuals named external assessors (examiners appointed by the IB) on a scale of 0 to There are "general" and "subject-specific" criteria, at a ratio of (24 possible marks for the general criteria and 12 marks for the subject-specific one). The total mark is converted into a grade from A to E. A similar system is used for theory of knowledge and students can gain up to 3 points for the diploma based on the grades achieved for EE and TOK. A scores of E on either the extended essay or TOK essay revoked the eligibility of receiving the IB Diploma (EE Subject Guide p15).[2]

Theory of Knowledge
Extended Essay
ABCDE or N
A3321Failing Condition
B3211
C2110
D1100
E or NFailing Condition
Source: The diploma points matrix. May onwards[3]

References[edit]

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *