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Sredni Vashtar Analysis Essays Samples

Unformatted text preview: Sredni Vashtar: Example Essay Analyse the strengths and weakness of this response. Saki illuminates an array of themes which previously had been considered controversial to discuss, such as say child loneliness and child depression, making a seemingly personal and exceptionally strong appeal to the reader on neglected topics such as the ones mentioned above. Besides, Saki goes to great depths, in spite of the relative short length of the story, to explore questions which are indispensable to man. Questions on hope and despair, inter-human relationships as well as on the somewhat symbiotic relationship between appearance and reality. The themes are, as mentioned, numerous, and what follows below is an attempt to elaborate on the key themes the author attempted to present. Strengths of introduction:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of introduction:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. One of the most evident themes is the theme of imprisonment. Conradin is, at least how he sees it, not free to live out his imagination, his fantasies — something every ten year old boy certainly wants to. Mrs De Ropp ironically stands as both his protector, her being his guardian, but also, and maybe more so, like his main vice and hinder to these imaginations becoming reality. She, in short, “represented those three fifths of the world that are necessary and disagreeable and real”. The imprisonment of Conradin is aggravated through the use of a range of effects, in particular the numerous windows through which he is observed, which were “ready to open with a message not to do this or that”, as if he was in a prison, but also through the writer stating that he was lonely and him never mentioning any joys of his prior to his exploration of the toolshed and Sredni Vashtar. The given that Conradin was terminally ill, is something which makes the rather ambivalent behavior towards him particularly peculiar, at least according to modern western culture. But was it, if at all, ambivalence that can best describe Mrs De Ropp’s behaviour towards the boy? Not so, some will claim, pointing to that this was completely natural due to the obvious differences between adults and children. Strengths of paragraph:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of paragraph:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. This difference is perhaps best explored when connected with the theme of family relationships and the importance of them, hope and despair as well. Conradin is living with his aunt, so, presumably, his parents were dead, as was the case with Saki himself. In fact, he was brought up by two sadistic aunts in England. Mrs De Ropp clearly displays little or no affection for Conradin, who, as a child, definitely had affection to display, which he ultimately “lavished” on the Houdan hen— “an affection that had scarcely another outlet”. She interpreted her “job” as his guardian as such and nothing more, leading to her being “dull and cheerless”, as Saki describes. As a result of this, Conradin looses more and more hope as he feels increasingly lonely and doomed until this mood of his shifts completely following his experiences in the toolshed. An appropriate question to ask will thus be whether the disappearance and probable death of Mrs De Ropp indeed would have been avoided had she acted as a caring and committed aunt in lieu of his parents. Saki leaves this open for interpretation, while at the same time clearly expressing his thoughts, bringing us to the theme of gods and other so-called super-humans. Strengths of paragraph:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of paragraph:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. Religion stood exceptionally strong in the early twentieth century, especially in the many colonies of the British Empire, which we, to some extent, can assume that this short story took place within. However, Conradin does not turn to God, or at least the one most of us consider to be the traditional one, but invents his own religion, his own cult. And although Conradin is partially able to find consolidation in Sredni Vashtar, he is most likely aware of the ferocious and destructive powers he possesses, which is not only illustrated by Sredni Vashtar making the disappearance of his aunt a given, but also through Conradin sparing the Houdan hen, a symbol of purity and hope, as interpreted by some. Furthermore, Mrs De Ropp is said to have “engaged in religion” once a week, which is only one of the many stark contrasts between her and Conradin, who has definitely been let down by her God Saki attempts at displaying. Strengths of paragraph:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of paragraph:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. As I as well would, at least according to the laws of most countries, be classified as a child, it is needless to say that this amplifies the effect of this touching story on me personally with regard to the topics that are touched by Saki. As mentioned extensively above, living in such a controlled, depressed and liberty-lacking environment — most of my peers and me included would find it appalling, were we subject to it. This is especially true when comparing Conradin’s liberties to the liberties many youngsters and teens in today’s world are granted without hesitation from their parents. At the same time, this story to me has a unique effect in that it argues that super-human elements are existent in every realm of life, thus the themes of the short story included. This ultimately leaves me with a dire and keen interest to explore the theme of superstition, which nowadays is more rarely seen, in the writings of both Saki himself and those of other writers as well. In essence, this eloquent and persuasive to me touches every base, as the Americans would say, starting from the importance of child rights and imaginations to that of maintaining strong family bonds. Strengths of paragraph:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of paragraph:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. “A short story is, or should be, a simple thing”, the renowned British novelist H.G. Wells once wrote. However, this short story can be said to be the exact opposite. Although it at first seem like a “simple thing”, it is far from being so, something which is very evident when considering the array of themes which are included as well as the focus on each of them in particular Saki has placed. This essentially leaves him able to tie all the topics together through the use of one symbol, namely Sredni Vashtar. Ultimately, everything in this short story revolves around him, “the beautiful”, starting from the theme of relationships to the one of death, from imprisonment and despair to the theme of hope. It is, in spite of his evil deeds, in him the truth and light lies, and his force is a deep force which stirs within Conradin, and all other children in the same or similar situation, still. Strengths of conclusion:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Weaknesses of conclusion:…………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. What do you think the title of the essay is and why? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..………………………………………… …………………………………………………………….……..………………………………………………………………………………………
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  1. Hi, Please can someone post some tips for IGCSE English Literature on how to get A*? I am doing tempest, importance of being Earnest, Songs of ourselves and stories of ourselves. Thank you in advance

  2. Here's some general tips:

    -- Never write an introduction. Ever. An introductory sentence is fine, but remember you only get marks for actually analysing the text.

    -- Refer back to the question in every point you make. Using similar wording to the question helps as well. E.g. if the question was "how does *author* make this a dramatic moment in the story?" you would say something like "in this way, *author* makes this moment dramatic" at the end of your point.

    -- Point, Evidence, Explanation. Make your point, give evidence of your point in the form of a quote and explain as clearly as you can how the quote backs up your point. The explanation bit is the most important - if you can do that part consistently well you'll get an A*.

    EXAMPLE (made this up now ):

    Another way in which the author makes this an exciting moment in the play is by using similes, an example of which is, "his eyes gleamed as brightly as the sun." In this case, a sense of excitement is created as it is clear that he is interested. This sense of excitement is strengthened through the use of a simile as it draws a direct comparison between the brightness of his eyes to the brightness of the sun, even though the sun is normally far brighter. As a result this moment in the poem is made very exciting.

    Hope this helped

    Last edited by GreatBantz; at
  3. Personally I would disagree about your introduction point. You'll get marks for contextualizing the passage (if you are answering the passage based question) or generally giving the areas where the question is relevant. Secondly, 'signpost' or outline the three areas/themes/paragraphs in your essay. This helps to structure your essay and also allows you to show linkage between all the three paragraphs your going to make and how that links to the question.

    Also buzzwords There's maybe 2 or 3 words in the question which you should try and use throughout your essay (or synonyms thereof) to link back to the question.

    In your paragraph use the connotations of words to back up your point for instance:

    When Hardy is describing the scene in 'Neutral tones' he talks about how the leaves 'had fallen from an ash'. Although on one hand he seems to be reffering to an ash tree, it also perhaps draws more metaphorical connotations of the extinguished flame of the two figure's relationship that only further emphasizes the dead landscape.

    At the start of every paragraph include a topic sentence which all your other points are going to come from essentialy for instance;

    Hardy vividly convey, the poet's feeling through the use of a monotone landscape, only further reflecting the subject's own depressed emotional state


    And last of all embed small quotations. For instance instead of:

    This is shown by 'and a few leaves lay on the starving sod'

    try:

    (Original post by GreatBantz)
    Here's some general tips:

    -- Never write an introduction. Ever. An introductory sentence is fine, but remember you only get marks for actually analysing the text.

    -- Refer back to the question in every point you make. Using similar wording to the question helps as well. E.g. if the question was "how does *author* make this a dramatic moment in the story?" you would say something like "in this way, *author* makes this moment dramatic" at the end of your point.

    -- Point, Evidence, Explanation. Make your point, give evidence of your point in the form of a quote and explain as clearly as you can how the quote backs up your point. The explanation bit is the most important - if you can do that part consistently well you'll get an A*.

    EXAMPLE (made this up now ):

    Another way in which the author makes this an exciting moment in the play is by using similes, an example of which is, "his eyes gleamed as brightly as the sun." In this case, a sense of excitement is created as it is clear that he is interested. This sense of excitement is strengthened through the use of a simile as it draws a direct comparison between the brightness of his eyes to the brightness of the sun, even though the sun is normally far brighter. As a result this moment in the poem is made very exciting.

    Hope this helped

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