Research Paper Graphic Organizers For Kids

These organizers are customizable--you may type in the headers, subheaders, directions, and instructional material that best suit your needs. 

I've included these because sometimes predesigned forms are not entirely appropriate for the task at hand.

This way, if you have a particular book title or a particular main topic that you want to appear in the organizer, you can go right ahead and type it in. 

Each customizable organizer displays areas shaded in blue--these are the areas that you may type what you wish.  Additionally, when the mouse pointer passes each of these shaded areas, a tool tip will pop up briefly as you see in the yellow box here:

Here are the 17 customizable graphic organizers.  The original completed organizer appears on the left side of each slide, and its customizable version appears on the right.

The organizers on the last 5 slides have been rotated 90 degrees to fit into the slide show.

If these graphic organizers are fairly well received, I would be happy to design more of them in the near future.



Free Download

Return to Top of Page

The following 10 graphic organizers for teaching writing (reduced in size here to fit the slideshow) are available for immediate download.



You may download them completely free of charge here.

If you would like these 10 organizers PLUS the other 40 presented on this page, you may want to download the 50 WRITERizers Collection.

This collection includes ALL 50 PDF graphic organizers for teaching planning and writing as seen above on this page. Whether you use Windows or Mac, these PDF organizers are ready to print!

And, as I mentioned back in the introduction, if you like these, I’ve got a strong feeling that you’ll also like 50 More WRITERizers—the newer sibling of this collection.

Conclusion

Return to Top of Page
free graphic organizers
I would imagine that most of the graphic organizers presented on this page would be suitable for any grade level. I deliberately left out the graphic images on some of the customizable organizers simply because I don't know what grade level you teach. free graphic organizers
Although earlier versions of Adobe's PDF software included a provision for end users to import and add their own graphics, the most recent version does not. free graphic organizers

I am acutely aware of the fact that many more types of graphic organizers for teaching writing could be designed and created. free graphic organizers
Tell me what you need. free graphic organizers

Finally, as I mentioned in the Introduction of my Language Arts Graphic Organizers page, kids just seem to GET IT better when they have a means of visually and pictorially organizing their thoughts.

The "lights" in their eyes just seem to burn more brightly . . . free graphic organizers
Best wishes to you and your kids. And, let the lights shine on.

Return to Daily Teaching Tools from Free Graphic Organizers for Planning and Writing



Circle Chad Manis on Google+!


Daily Teaching Tools: Links LibrarySoftware ToolsFree Teaching Software for Language Arts Middle School Kids Teaching software: Talking avatars teach 30 language arts mini-lessons via digital projector or SMART Board while you relax, 20 writing tutorials, 60 multimedia warm ups . . . Free Writing Software: Great for Journalism and Language Arts This free writing software is designed for individual workstations. 20 step by step tutorials are available for producing articles, reviews, essays . . . Middle School English: A Dynamic Collection of Multimedia Warm Ups Free download of middle school English warm up activities for display via digital projector, SMART Board, or the classroom TV. 5 activities for each of 12 categor . . Language Arts: Great Free Teaching Software for Middle School Talking avatars teach 30 language arts mini-lessons via digital projector or smart board while YOU relax. Author's purpose, how to summarize, main idea . . . Strategies and Methods ToolsMotivating Students: This Set of Strategies Really Works with Kids A comprehensive strategy for motivating students: enhance classroom participation, teamwork, individual effort, and more. Free downloads are available. Using Teaching Strategies to Increase Participation, Interest, and Motivation Teaching Strategies: Step by step examples for planning, implementing, and evaluating inductive and deductive activities that really work with kids . . . Teaching Methods: Deliver Meaningful Content with the Deductive Approach Teaching methods: The deductive approach is a great way to deliver concepts quickly and efficiently. Start with the objective and use students' responses to structure the lesson . . . Teaching Methods: How to Effectively Use Inductive Teaching Activities with Kids These inductive teaching methods are guaranteed to increase student motivation and participation. Kids learn content while sharpening processing skills . . . Teaching Methods: An Awesome Inductive Teaching Approach for All Subject Areas Of all the inductive teaching methods, this one, is clearly my favorite. Students learn content while establishing their confidence as learners. This REALLY works! Teaching with Technology: Using the Internet, Classroom Computers, Elmo, and Wow them by teaching with technology! Useful tips on using digital projectors, classroom computers, the Internet, Elmo, and SMART Board. Free downloads. Classroom Management ToolsA Comprehensive Classroom Management Strategy that Really Works with Kids Classroom Management: Establishing classroom routines, providing warm up activities, structuring instructional time, the "Going to the Movies" approach, setting expectations, and . . . Effective Classroom Management: Organizing to Enhance Discipline and Order Organizing for effective classroom management: Use these reliable strategies to greatly improve discipline and order. A place for everything and . . . Establish Effective Classroom Routines to Guarantee a Successful School Year Classroom routines: Controlling traffic, preparing students for instruction, obtaining materials, managing the pencil sharpener, maximizing instructional time, more . . . CHAMPs Classroom Management: Designing and Implementing the System CHAMPs Classroom Management: How to develop strategies for multiple instructional approaches, tips on how to implement strategies, examples of CHAMPs strategies, and . . . Tools for Teaching WritingWriting Prompts: Over for Practice Essays, Journal Entries, and More Persuasive and expository essay writing prompts, reader response questions and statements, and journal writing prompts for every day of the school year. Journal Writing Prompts: Enough for Every Day of the School Year Journal Writing Prompts: These high-interest prompts will encourage kids to describe, explain, persuade, and narrate every day of the school year . . . Reader Response Questions and Prompts for Fiction and Nonfiction Reader Response Questions: These prompts give students focus and purpose as they respond in writing to fiction and nonfiction they have read . . . Essay Writing Prompts For Persuasive and Expository Compositions Essay Writing Prompts: Over two and a half school years' worth of prompts for persuasive and expository compositions. Use them for practice or for the . . . Tools for New Teachers
First Year Teachers: Great Tips for Enhancing Effectiveness Ideas for first year teachers: Establishing connections with kids, showcasing relevance, managing the classroom, using classroom routines, communicating with parents, and . . . First Day of School: Absolute Musts for Getting Off to a Great Start Ideas for a great first day of school: Use the Wow! Factor, create immediate opportunity for success, establish the tone, provide motivation, describe expectations, and . . . Establish Effective Classroom Routines to Guarantee a Successful School Year Classroom routines: Controlling traffic, preparing students for instruction, obtaining materials, managing the pencil sharpener, maximizing instructional time, more . . . Teaching Resource ToolsClassroom Libraries: Acquiring Books, Establishing Procedures, More Classroom Libraries: Everything from acquiring and organizing books to establishing procedures. Free downloads of several pertinent documents. Online Teacher Resources: Free Websites Offer Great Classroom Tools These free online teacher resources offer a wide variety of useful tools: activities, incentives, reference resources, downloadables, lesson plans, and more . . . Ideas for Teachers: Please Help Us with Your Experience and Expertise What ideas for teachers could you share with us? A strategy or procedure, perhaps? Something that you have found to be effective with kids? Tools for Your Students (much more coming shortly)25 Language Arts Graphic Organizers Language arts graphic organizers: story maps, double entry diary, concept wheel, 5 paragraph essay planner, think-pair-share chart, Venn diagrams for 2 or 3 topics, Tools Coming SoonIdeas for Bulletin Boards Bulletin Boards: All you need is card stock paper for this pile of ready-to-use, fully-customizable signs and posters. These downloadables are entirely free of charge. © Copyright by Chad Manis, woaknb.wz.sk All rights reserved.

woaknb.wz.sk

Print This Page

Lesson Plan

Scaffolding Methods for Research Paper Writing

 

Grades6 – 8
Lesson Plan TypeUnit
Estimated TimeSeven or eight minute sessions
Lesson Author

Publisher

&#;

Preview

OVERVIEW

Students will use scaffolding to research and organize information for writing a research paper. A research paper scaffold provides students with clear support for writing expository papers that include a question (problem), literature review, analysis, methodology for original research, results, conclusion, and references. Students examine informational text, use an inquiry-based approach, and practice genre-specific strategies for expository writing. Depending on the goals of the assignment, students may work collaboratively or as individuals. A student-written paper about color psychology provides an authentic model of a scaffold and the corresponding finished paper. The research paper scaffold is designed to be completed during seven or eight sessions over the course of four to six weeks.

back to top

&#;

FEATURED RESOURCES

back to top

&#;

FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

O'Day, S. () Setting the stage for creative writing: Plot scaffolds for beginning and intermediate writers. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

  • Research paper scaffolding provides a temporary linguistic tool to assist students as they organize their expository writing. Scaffolding assists students in moving to levels of language performance they might be unable to obtain without this support.

  • An instructional scaffold essentially changes the role of the teacher from that of giver of knowledge to leader in inquiry. This relationship encourages creative intelligence on the part of both teacher and student, which in turn may broaden the notion of literacy so as to include more learning styles.

  • An instructional scaffold is useful for expository writing because of its basis in problem solving, ownership, appropriateness, support, collaboration, and internalization. It allows students to start where they are comfortable, and provides a genre-based structure for organizing creative ideas.

 

Biancarosa, G., and Snow, C. E. () Reading next-A vision for action and research in middle and high school literacy: A report from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education.

  • In order for students to take ownership of knowledge, they must learn to rework raw information, use details and facts, and write.

  • Teaching writing should involve direct, explicit comprehension instruction, effective instructional principles embedded in content, motivation and self-directed learning, and text-based collaborative learning to improve middle school and high school literacy.

  • Expository writing, because its organizational structure is rooted in classical rhetoric, needs to be taught.

back to top

Standards

NCTE/IRA NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

1.

Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

&#;

2.

Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

&#;

3.

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

&#;

4.

Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

&#;

5.

Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

&#;

6.

Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

&#;

7.

Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

&#;

8.

Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

&#;

Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

&#;

back to top

Resources & Preparation

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

Computers with Internet access and printing capability

back to top

&#;

PRINTOUTS

back to top

&#;

WEBSITES

back to top

&#;

PREPARATION

1.Decide how you will schedule the seven or eight class sessions in the lesson to allow students time for independent research. You may wish to reserve one day each week as the “research project day.” The schedule should provide students time to plan ahead and collect materials for one section of the scaffold at a time, and allow you time to assess each section as students complete it, which is important as each section builds upon the previous one.

2.Make a copy for each student of the Research Paper Scaffold, the Example Research Paper Scaffold, the Example Student Research Paper, the Internet Citation Checklist, and the Research Paper Scoring Rubric. Also fill out and copy the Permission Form if you will be getting parents’ permission for the research projects.

3.If necessary, reserve time in the computer lab for Sessions 2 and 8. Decide which citation website students will use to format reference citations (see Websites) and bookmark it on student computers.

4.Schedule time for research in the school media center or the computer lab between Sessions 2 and 3.

back to top

Instructional Plan

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • Formulate a clear thesis that conveys a perspective on the subject of their research

  • Practice research skills, including evaluation of sources, paraphrasing and summarizing relevant information, and citation of sources used

  • Logically group and sequence ideas in expository writing

  • Organize and display information on charts, maps, and graphs

back to top

&#;

Session 1: Research Question

1.Distribute copies of the Example Research Paper Scaffold and Example Student Research Paper, and read the model aloud with students. Briefly discuss how this research paper works to answer the question, How does color affect mood? The example helps students clearly see how a research question leads to a literature review, which in turn leads to analysis, original research, results, and conclusion.

2.Pass out copies of the Research Paper Scaffold. Explain to students that the procedures involved in writing a research paper follow in order, and each section of the scaffold builds upon the previous one. Briefly describe how each section will be completed during subsequent sessions.

3.Explain that in this session the students’ task is to formulate a research question and write it on the scaffold. Note: The most important strategy in using this model is that students be allowed, within the assigned topic framework, to ask their own research questions. Allowing students to choose their own questions gives them control over their own learning, so they are motivated to “solve the case,” to persevere even when the trail runs cold or the detective work seems unexciting.

4.Introduce the characteristics of a good research question. Explain that in a broad area such as political science, psychology, geography, or economics, a good question needs to focus on a particular controversy or perspective. Some examples include:
  • Why did Martin Luther King Jr. deserve the Nobel Peace Prize?

  • How has glass affected human culture?

  • What is the history of cheerleading?
Explain that students should take care not to formulate a research question so broad that it cannot be answered, or so narrow that it can be answered in a sentence or two.

5.Note that a good question always leads to more questions. Invite students to suggest additional questions resulting from the examples above and from the Example Research Paper Scaffold.

6.Emphasize that good research questions are open-ended. Open-ended questions can be solved in more than one way and, depending upon interpretation, often have more than one correct answer, such as the question, Can virtue be taught? Closed questions have only one correct answer, such as, How many continents are there in the world? Open-ended questions are implicit and evaluative, while closed questions are explicit. Have students identify possible problems with these research questions
  • Why do people’s moods change? (too broad)

  • Why do doctors traditionally wear white?
    This question is too narrow for a five-page paper as it can be answered in just a few words.

  • How does color affect mood? (open-ended)
    This is broader, yet not so large that it would run over the five-page requirement.
7.Instruct students to fill in the first section of the Research Paper Scaffold, the Research Question, before Session 2. This task can be completed in a subsequent class session or assigned as homework. Allowing a few days for students to refine and reflect upon their research question is best practice. Explain that the next section, the Hook, should not be filled in at this time, as it will be completed using information from the literature search.


You should approve students’ final research questions before Session 2. You may also wish to send home the Permission Form with students, to make parents aware of their child’s research topic and the project due dates.

back to top

&#;

Session 2: Literature Review—Search

Prior to this session, you may want to introduce or review Internet search techniques using the lesson Inquiry on the Internet: Evaluating Web Pages for a Class Collection. You may also wish to consult with the school librarian regarding subscription databases designed specifically for student research, which may be available through the school or public library. Using these types of resources will help to ensure that students find relevant and appropriate information. Using Internet search engines such as Google can be overwhelming to beginning researchers.

1.Introduce this session by explaining that students will collect five articles that help to answer their research question. Once they have printed out or photocopied the articles, they will use a highlighter to mark the sections in the articles that specifically address the research question. This strategy helps students focus on the research question rather than on all the other interesting—yet irrelevant—facts that they will find in the course of their research.

2.Point out that the five different articles may offer similar answers and evidence with regard to the research question, or they may differ. The final paper will be more interesting if it explores different perspectives.

3.Demonstrate the use of any relevant subscription databases that are available to students through the school, as well as any Web directories or kid-friendly search engines (such as KidzSearch) that you would like them to use.

4.Remind students that their research question can provide the keywords for a targeted Internet search. The question should also give focus to the research—without the research question to anchor them, students may go off track.

5.Explain that information found in the articles may lead students to broaden their research question. A good literature review should be a way of opening doors to new ideas, not simply a search for the data that supports a preconceived notion.

6.Make students aware that their online search results may include abstracts, which are brief summaries of research articles. In many cases the full text of the articles is available only through subscription to a scholarly database. Provide examples of abstracts and scholarly articles so students can recognize that abstracts do not contain all the information found in the article, and should not be cited unless the full article has been read.

7.Emphasize that students need to find articles from at least five different reliable sources that provide “clues” to answering their research question. Internet articles need to be printed out, and articles from print sources need to be photocopied. Each article used on the Research Paper Scaffold needs to yield several relevant facts, so students may need to collect more than five articles to have adequate sources.

8.Remind students to gather complete reference information for each of their sources. They may wish to photocopy the title page of books where they find information, and print out the homepage or contact page of websites.

9.Allow students at least a week for research. Schedule time in the school media center or the computer lab so you can supervise and assist students as they search for relevant articles. Students can also complete their research as homework.

back to top

&#;

Session 3: Literature Review—Notes

Students need to bring their articles to this session. For large classes, have students highlight relevant information (as described below) and submit the articles for assessment before beginning the session.

1.Have students find the specific information in each article that helps answer their research question, and highlight the relevant passages. Check that students have correctly identified and marked relevant information before allowing them to proceed to the Literature Review section on the Research Paper Scaffold.

2.Instruct students to complete the Literature Review section of the Research Paper Scaffold, including the last name of the author and the publication date for each article (to prepare for using APA citation style).

3.Have students list the important facts they found in each article on the lines numbered 1–5, as shown on the Example Research Paper Scaffold. Additional facts can be listed on the back of the handout. Remind students that if they copy directly from a text they need to put the copied material in quotation marks and note the page number of the source. Note: Students may need more research time following this session to find additional information relevant to their research question.

4.Explain that interesting facts that are not relevant for the literature review section can be listed in the section labeled Hook. All good writers, whether they are writing narrative, persuasive, or expository text, need to engage or “hook” the reader’s interest. Facts listed in the Hook section can be valuable for introducing the research paper.

5.Use the Example Research Paper Scaffold to illustrate how to fill in the first and last lines of the Literature Review entry, which represent topic and concluding sentences. These should be filled in only after all the relevant facts from the source have been listed, to ensure that students are basing their research on facts that are found in the data, rather than making the facts fit a preconceived idea.

6.Check students’ scaffolds as they complete their first literature review entry, to make sure they are on track. Then have students complete the other four sections of the Literature Review Section in the same manner.


Checking Literature Review entries on the same day is best practice, as it gives both you and the student time to plan and address any problems before proceeding. Note that in the finished product this literature review section will be about six paragraphs, so students need to gather enough facts to fit this format.

back to top

&#;

Session 4: Analysis

1.Explain that in this session students will compare the information they have gathered from various sources to identify themes.

2.Explain the process of analysis using the Example Research Paper Scaffold. Show how making a numbered list of possible themes, drawn from the different perspectives proposed in the literature, can be useful for analysis. In the Example Research Paper Scaffold, there are four possible explanations given for the effects of color on mood. Remind students that they can refer to the Example Student Research Paper for a model of how the analysis will be used in the final research paper.

3.Have students identify common themes and possible answers to their own research question by reviewing the topic and concluding sentences in their literature review. Students may identify only one main idea in each source, or they may find several. Instruct students to list the ideas and summarize their similarities and differences in the space provided for Analysis on the scaffold.

4.Check students’ Analysis section entries to make sure they have included theories that are consistent with their literature review. Return the Research Paper Scaffolds to students with comments and corrections. Note: In the finished research paper, the analysis section will be about one paragraph.

back to top

&#;

Session 5: Original Research

Students should design some form of original research appropriate to their topics, but they do not necessarily have to conduct the experiments or surveys they propose. Depending on the appropriateness of the original research proposals, the time involved, and the resources available, you may prefer to omit the actual research or use it as an extension activity.

1.During this session, students formulate one or more possible answers to the research question (based upon their analysis) for possible testing. Invite students to consider and briefly discuss the following questions:
  • How can you tell whether the ideas you are reading are true?

  • If there are two or more solutions to a problem, which one is the best?

  • Researchers verify the validity of their findings by devising original research to test them, but what kind of test works best in a given situation?
2.Explain the difference between qualitative and quantitative research. Quantitative methods involve the collection of numeric data, while qualitative methods focus primarily on the collection of observable data. Quantitative studies have large numbers of participants and produce a large collection of data (such as results from people taking a question survey). Qualitative methods involve few participants and rely upon the researcher to serve as a “reporter” who records direct observations of a specific population. Qualitative methods involve more detailed interviews and artifact collection.

3.Point out that each student’s research question and analysis will determine which method is more appropriate. Show how the research question in the Example Research Paper Scaffold goes beyond what is reported in a literature review and adds new information to what is already known.

4.Outline criteria for acceptable research studies, and explain that you will need to approve each student’s plan before the research is done. The following criteria should be included:
  • The test needs to be “doable” within the time frame allotted (usually one to two weeks).

  • The test must be safe, both physically and mentally, for those involved. This means no unsupervised, dangerous experiments.

  • Parental approval should be obtained (see Permission Form).

  • The number of subjects should be kept to multiples of 10, so it is easier to report the data statistically.

  • If the research involves a survey
  • An equal number of male and female participants should be included if possible.

  • A wide range of ages should be included if possible.

  • The survey should have no more than 10 questions.

  • The survey form should include an introduction that states why the survey is being conducted and what the researcher plans to do with the data.
5.Inform students of the schedule for submitting their research plans for approval and completing their original research. Students need to conduct their tests and collect all data prior to Session 6. Normally it takes one day to complete research plans and one to two weeks to conduct the test.

back to top

&#;

Session 6: Results (optional)

1.If students have conducted original research, instruct them to report the results from their experiments or surveys. Quantitative results can be reported on a chart, graph, or table. Qualitative studies may include data in the form of pictures, artifacts, notes, and interviews. Study results can be displayed in any kind of visual medium, such as a poster, PowerPoint presentation, or brochure.

2.Check the Results section of the scaffold and any visuals provided for consistency, accuracy, and effectiveness.

back to top

&#;

Session 7: Conclusion

1.Explain that the Conclusion to the research paper is the student’s answer to the research question. This section may be one to two paragraphs. Remind students that it should include supporting facts from both the literature review and the test results (if applicable).

2.Encourage students to use the Conclusion section to point out discrepancies and similarities in their findings, and to propose further studies. Discuss the Conclusion section of the Example Research Paper Scaffold from the standpoint of these guidelines.

3.Check the Conclusion section after students have completed it, to see that it contains a logical summary and is consistent with the study results.

back to top

&#;

Session 8: References and Writing Final Draft

1.Show students how to create a reference list of cited material, using a model such as American Psychological Association (APA) style, on the Reference section of the scaffold.

2.Distribute copies of the Internet Citation Checklist and have students refer to the handout as they list their reference information in the Reference section of the scaffold. Check students’ entries as they are working to make sure they understand the format correctly.

3.Have students access the citation site you have bookmarked on their computers. Demonstrate how to use the template or follow the guidelines provided, and have students create and print out a reference list to attach to their final research paper.

4.Explain to students that they will now use the completed scaffold to write the final research paper using the following genre-specific strategies for expository writing:
  • Use active, present tense verbs when possible.

  • Avoid the use of personal pronouns such as I and my (unless the research method was qualitative).

  • Cite all sources.
5.Distribute copies of the Research Paper Scoring Rubric and go over the criteria so that students understand how their final written work will be evaluated.

back to top

&#;

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Observe students’ participation in the initial stages of the Research Paper Scaffold and promptly address any errors or misconceptions about the research process.

  • Observe students and provide feedback as they complete each section of the Research Paper Scaffold.

  • Provide a safe environment where students will want to take risks in exploring ideas. During collaborative work, offer feedback and guidance to those who need encouragement or require assistance in learning cooperation and tolerance.

  • Involve students in using the Research Paper Scoring Rubric for final evaluation of the research paper. Go over this rubric during Session 8, before they write their final drafts.

back to top

Related Resources

PRINTOUTS

Grades   9 – 12 &#;|&#; Printout  |  Graphic Organizer

I-Search Process Reflection Chart

This chart asks students to consider their challenges and successes across the span of the research process, from question formulation to the final write-up.

&#;

Grades   9 – 12 &#;|&#; Printout  |  Graphic Organizer

I-Search Chart

As part of an I-Search writing process, this handout facilitates the formation of meaningful questions and subquestions for student inquiry.

&#;

back to top

&#;

STRATEGY GUIDES

Grades   8 – 12 &#;|&#; Strategy Guide

Promoting Student-Directed Inquiry with the I-Search Paper

The sense of curiosity behind research writing gets lost in some school-based assignments. This Strategy Guide provides the foundation for cultivating interest and authority through I-Search writing, including publishing online.

&#;

back to top

&#;

PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY

Grades   K – 8 &#;|&#; Professional Library  |  Book

Setting the Stage for Creative Writing: Plot Scaffolds for Beginning and Intermediate Writers

Want to foster creativity and originality in student writing? This practical guide shows how plot scaffolds can be used to help beginning and intermediate writers.

&#;

back to top

Comments

Dan Patterson

December 15,

I&#;m a high school special ed. teacher. Probably half of my kids are college bound, and this tool is really going to set them up for success today and into the future. Thanks.

&#;

This is such an amazing and useful tool! I feel that for a large majority of emerging researchers, that this has been extremely effective!

&#;

We are using this lesson to work on writing a research article. I created a model article out of the example paper and posted it to our blog. Take a look here - woaknb.wz.sk

&#;

Marianne

November 18,

While I was looking for replacements for a few of the links that are now defunct I found an interesting search engine that actually includes links to numerous different metasearch engines, search engines, reference and research engines, calendars, the World Fact Book, news sites, and more – great site! It redirects you to the site under which you searched.
woaknb.wz.sk

&#;

&#;

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *